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Michael Rathbun
New member
Username: Connatic

Post Number: 1
Registered: 07-2007
Posted on Friday, December 07, 2007 - 03:50 pm:   

Several times per month a parent waiting to pick up a child from the neighborhood elementary school will park across the entrance to the alley serving residences on my street. Frequently they will decline to move.

In a community we previously resided in, residential alleys were by law considered to be fire lanes, and deliberately blocking a fire lane potentially attracted a substantial fine.

I've reviewed the Frisco City Code of Ordinances, but haven't been able to find anything explicit with regard to whether a person may block an alley entrance with a vehicle and simply refuse to move because she would lose her place in line.

Any references would be appreciated.
 

Todd Renshaw, Chief of Police
Moderator
Username: Todd

Post Number: 365
Registered: 01-2002
Posted on Monday, December 10, 2007 - 08:44 am:   

Hi Michael,

Its been a while since we have been asked about all of the parking requirements. I will post the portion of the Transportation Code below for reference. If I understand you correctly, the driver is standing in an intersection, which is prohibited by state law. There is no differentiation between an alley and a street. If you will send me an email with the location, I'll have an officer watch for it.

545.302. STOPPING, STANDING, OR PARKING PROHIBITED IN
CERTAIN PLACES. (a) An operator may not stop, stand, or park a
vehicle:
(1) on the roadway side of a vehicle stopped or parked
at the edge or curb of a street;
(2) on a sidewalk;
(3) in an intersection;
(4) on a crosswalk;
(5) between a safety zone and the adjacent curb or
within 30 feet of a place on the curb immediately opposite the ends
of a safety zone, unless the governing body of a municipality
designates a different length by signs or markings;
(6) alongside or opposite a street excavation or
obstruction if stopping, standing, or parking the vehicle would
obstruct traffic;
(7) on a bridge or other elevated structure on a
highway or in a highway tunnel;
(8) on a railroad track; or
(9) where an official sign prohibits stopping.
(b) An operator may not, except momentarily to pick up or
discharge a passenger, stand or park an occupied or unoccupied
vehicle:
(1) in front of a public or private driveway;
(2) within 15 feet of a fire hydrant;
(3) within 20 feet of a crosswalk at an intersection;
(4) within 30 feet on the approach to a flashing
signal, stop sign, yield sign, or traffic-control signal located at
the side of a roadway;
(5) within 20 feet of the driveway entrance to a fire
station and on the side of a street opposite the entrance to a fire
station within 75 feet of the entrance, if the entrance is properly
marked with a sign; or
(6) where an official sign prohibits standing.
(c) An operator may not, except temporarily to load or
unload merchandise or passengers, park an occupied or unoccupied
vehicle:
(1) within 50 feet of the nearest rail of a railroad
crossing; or
(2) where an official sign prohibits parking.
(d) A person may stop, stand, or park a bicycle on a sidewalk
if the bicycle does not impede the normal and reasonable movement of
pedestrian or other traffic on the sidewalk.
 

Brian C
New member
Username: Brianc

Post Number: 121
Registered: 06-2003
Posted on Saturday, December 15, 2007 - 03:19 am:   

Chief Renshaw, what is the law on how close you can park to an alley entrance? Example, an alley entrance in the middle of a residential street, too often people are parking right against the curb cut-in and you can't see when trying to enter/exit the alley. Thanks.
 

Todd Renshaw, Chief of Police
Moderator
Username: Todd

Post Number: 366
Registered: 01-2002
Posted on Monday, December 17, 2007 - 11:03 am:   

The parking restrictions in state law are printed above. If the vehicle in question is not violating any of the guidelines above, they would be legally parked.

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